Emulation legality and extracting images from your own game cartridges

This post expands upon the contents of the static page on the legalities of emulation

As stated in the main Emulation Legality page, this is a complex issue (and differs across jurisdictions throughout the world). Anyone wishing to make backups of their own games is urged to conduct their own research before proceeding.

Stances towards the use of emulators and images/roms/iso’s differs from country to country, from hardware manufacturer to manufacturer, and from software developer to developer.

Nintendo, for example, provides detailed information regarding that company’s standpoint with regards to the use of emulators and game images:

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Overview of Raspberry Pi and retro-gaming system hardware

The Raspberry Pi installation to which all of the current blog posts (at time of writing) relate is as follows:

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Core System Components

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
Raspberry Pi 3 Model B (RS Components)

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B - Image: RS Components
Raspberry Pi 3 Model B – Image: RS Components

Raspberry Pi 2 Model B
Raspberry Pi 2 Model B (RS Components)

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Raspberry Pi 2 Model 2

The Pi 2 has been overclocked to extract the maximum performance possible, as many video game system emulators push the hardware to the limits. Please see the series of posts on overclocking and stability testing, beginning with part one, for further details.

Power supply: 5 volt, 2 amp micro usb
Official Raspberry Pi Power Unit (RS Components)

Micro SD memory card
SanDisk SDSDQUN-032G-FFP-A Ultra microSDHC UHS-I Class 10 Memory Card
SanDisk 32GB micro SD (Amazon)
I’ve had mixed success with compatibility of cards in the Pi 2 – most have worked; one 16Gb card was unstable under Noobs and Raspbian, but fine with the RetroPie image

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